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It Chapter Two [2019] (3 discs)

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Director:Andy Muschietti
Writer:Gary Dauberman
Composer:Benjamin Wallfisch
Length:169 minutes
(2 hours 49 minutes)
MPAA Rating:R
Sorting Category:Susp/Hor
Sorting Tub:Alpha
IMDB Rating:6.7/10
Rotten Tomatoes Rating:63%
Amazon Rating:4.0/5 stars
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Classifications:
  • Fantasy
  • Suspense / Horror
  • Drama
  • Action
  • CG
  • Sci-Fi
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Synopsis: Twenty-seven years after their first encounter with the terrifying Pennywise, the Losers Club have grown up and moved away, until a devastating phone call brings them back.


Reaction: Overall there are entertaining segments but it doesn't, in the end, end up being quite as scary or effective as the first movie. There are some interesting changes to the story to update it and accommodate splitting the story the way they did. But the ending could be better.


Personal Rating: 6/10

Select Cast and Crew
Andy Muschietti => Director / Customer at Pharmacy (uncredited)
Gary Dauberman => Writer
Benjamin Wallfisch => Composer
Andy Bean => Stanley Uris
Ari Cohen => Stanley's Dad
Bill Hader => Richie Tozier
Bill Skarsgård => Pennywise
Brandon Crane => Big Guy
Chosen Jacobs => Young Mike Hanlon
Doug MacLeod => Head Honcho
Finn Wolfhard => Young Richie Tozier
Isaiah Mustafa => Mike Hanlon
Jack Dylan Grazer => Young Eddie Kaspbrak
Jackson Robert Scott => Dead Georgie
Jaeden Martell => Young Bill Denbrough
Jake Sim => Belch Huggins
James McAvoy => Bill Denbrough
James Ransone => Eddie Kaspbrak
Javier Botet => The Witch / Hobo
Jay Ryan => Ben Hanscom
Jeremy Ray Taylor => Young Ben Hanscom
Jess Weixler => Audra Phillips
Jessica Chastain => Beverly Marsh
Joan Gregson => Mrs. Kersh
Logan Thompson => Victor Criss
Megan Charpentier => Young Gretta
Molly Atkinson => Myra / Sonia Kaspbrak
Nicholas Hamilton => Young Henry Bowers
Owen Teague => Dead Hockstetter
Peter Bogdanovich => Peter - Director
Sophia Lillis => Young Beverly Marsh
Stephen Bogaert => Alvin Marsh
Stephen King => Shopkeeper
Stephen R. Hart => Shokopiwah Man (as Stephen Hart)
Taylor Frey => Don Hagarty
Teach Grant => Henry Bowers
Wyatt Oleff => Young Stanley Uris
Xavier Dolan => Adrian Mellon

Random Trivia For This Title:

  • In the book and TV movie, the line, "Beep, Beep Richie." was a way to tell Richie to stop talking. In Chapter One, this is only spoken by Pennywise, with no explanation. However due to fan outcry, it was added in a moment between Bev and Richie in Chapter Two.
  • When Richie (Bill Hader) sees the Stanley-spider, he says, "You've got to be F^@&ing kidding." In John Carpenter's The Thing (1982), a character says the exact same line reacting to a similar spider-head creature.
  • Bill Hader was unaware that Bill Skarsgård can actually move his eyes in two different directions. Hader asked Skarsgård what kind of editing was done to achieve the effect in the first movie. Skarsgård, in full costume and makeup, responded by saying "Oh, you mean this?" and doing it, causing Hader to freak out.
  • Bill Skarsgård (Pennywise) has stated that he had more fun on set during this movie because he was actually able to talk to and hang out with his adult co-stars. Skarsgård had minimal contact with his child co-stars in Chapter One so that they would be more genuinely scared of Pennywise once they saw him.
  • The young actors who were the Losers Club in chapter one grew tremendously in the 2 years following filming. They had to be digitally 'de-aged' in some scenes as they looked significantly older than before.
  • Bill Hader said since it was his first time acting in a horror film he struggled to act scared, because his natural reaction to being scared was to nervously smile.
  • When adult Richie enters the abandoned theater, there is a shot where an old delapidated You've Got Mail poster is behind him. If you look closely, the torn parts of the poster spell out "IT".
  • Bill Hader was approached for the role of Richie Tozier based on Finn Wolfhard's wish to cast him in the sequel. Hader, who had never met Wolfhard, was extremely flattered that Wolfhard wanted him to take on the role.
  • One of Richie Tozier's character traits is his ability to do "voices" and impressions. Bill Hader is a well-known impressionist, famous for the celebrity impressions he did for years on "[Saturday Night Live]." With this in mind, screenwriter Gary Dauberman wrote a scene in which Richie does an impression of Al Pacino, a voice that Hader is quite good at. However, Hader requested that the impression be removed from the script because the Pacino impression was old material and he didn't feel like doing it again.
  • Jessica Chastain was considered for Beverly while the first film was still in production. She was also the first one to be officially cast.
  • Seth Green, who played the young Richie in the TV movie It (1990), expressed interest in playing the adult Richie in this film.
  • At 2 hours and 49 minutes, this film is 34 minutes longer than It (2017), which ran for 2 hours and 15 minutes. In total, both films have a combined running time of 5 hours and 4 minutes, which is over two hours longer than the original 1990 miniseries adaptation of Stephen King's novel.
  • Idris Elba expressed interest in playing Mike prior to Isaiah Mustafa's casting. It would have been Elba's second Stephen King adaptation, following The Dark Tower (2017).
  • The casting for the adult Losers Club was overwhelmingly praised mainly due to the physical resemblances to the child actors. One of the issues that some people had with the It (1990) miniseries was that most of the adult actors looked nothing like the child actors.
  • Director Andy Muschietti stated that he plans to make a super cut of Chapter One and this film that's similar to the 90s miniseries.
  • On the side of Mike's Native American artifact is a symbol of a circle with one large point and several smaller points. This represents the Dark Tower. Stephen King's Dark Tower series of novels connects a number of his works including It, The Shining, The Stand, Salem's Lot, Insomnia, and numerous others. The sixth book, Song of Susannah, implies that It is one of the six greater demon elementals. It's rival, the turtle Maturin, is one of the guardians of the tower's beams while It's mission is to destroy the beam.
  • James McAvoy is a massive Stephen King fan and has read most of his books.
  • Pennywise is only in the film for 10 minutes.
  • In April 2018, it was announced that Bill Hader had entered talks to play Richie Tozier. In the same week, Harry Anderson, who played the role in It (1990), had passed away.
  • Jessica Chastain and Jess Weixler, who portrays Beverly and Audra, respectively, are real-life best friends.
  • Isaiah Mustafa went through Stephen King's novel eight times before filming so he could fully understand the character, Mike Hanlon.
  • When filming this film, Chosen Jacobs had to have wooden risers placed in his shoes because of how much the other Losers had grown.
  • Finn Wolfhard (young Richie Tozier) filmed both It Chapter Two (2019) and season 3 of [Stranger Things (2016)] at the same time. In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, he said it was tiring and stressful, but rewarding at the same time to shoot It Chapter Two (2019) during his off days from filming [Stranger Things (2016)] 3.
  • Marlon Taylor, Jarred Blancard, and Brandon Crane from the 1990 miniseries had expressed interest in reprising their roles as Mike Hanlon, Henry Bowers, and Ben Hanscom, respectively. Though, Crane ends up making a cameo in this film as one of Ben's employees at his architect company.
  • A recurring criticism about Stephen King's novels is his lack of inspiration for endings, even in otherwise well-acclaimed novels. This is repeatedly addressed in the movie, where Bill receives the same comments about his books (even from King in person).