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Kung Fu Panda [2008] (1 disc)

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Director:John Stevenson
Mark Osborne
Writer:Glenn Berger
Jonathan Aibel
Composer:Hans Zimmer
John Powell
Length:90 minutes
(1 hour 30 minutes)
MPAA Rating:PG
Sorting Category:Family
IMDB Rating:7.6/10
Rotten Tomatoes Rating:87%
Amazon Rating:4.5/5 stars
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Classifications:
  • Action
  • Comedy
  • CG
  • Kids
  • Fantasy
  • Family
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Synopsis: In the Valley of Peace, Po the Panda finds himself chosen as the Dragon Warrior despite the fact that he is obese and a complete novice at martial arts.


Reaction: Great fun and very funny.


Personal Rating: 9/10

Select Cast and Crew
John Stevenson => Director / Rhino Guard (voice)
Mark Osborne => Director / Pig Patron (voice)
Glenn Berger => Writer
Jonathan Aibel => Writer
Hans Zimmer => Composer
John Powell => Composer
Angelina Jolie => Tigress (voice)
Dan Fogler => Zeng (voice)
David Cross => Crane (voice)
Dustin Hoffman => Shifu (voice)
Ian McShane => Tai Lung (voice)
Jack Black => Po (voice)
Jackie Chan => Monkey (voice)
James Hong => Mr. Ping (voice)
JR Reed => JR Shaw (voice)
Kyle Gass => KG Shaw (voice)
Lucy Liu => Viper (voice)
Michael Clarke Duncan => Commander Vachir (voice)
Randall Duk Kim => Oogway (voice)
Seth Rogen => Mantis (voice)
Wayne Knight => Gang Boss (voice)

Random Trivia For This Title:

  • The opening scene is an homage to Japanese anime, as both directors are big fan of the genre. They wanted to distinguish the opening dream sequence, so they faked 3D into 2D.
  • According to VFX supervisor [?] Markus Manninen, the computer animation used throughout the film was more complex than anything DreamWorks had done before.
  • The Kung-Fu/Wuxia convention where attacks on the correct nerve/Chi points can cause paralysis and other effects is adopted although it is not explained in the film, and the jade figurine topped sticks on the shell worn on the imprisoned Tai Lung are positioned at the traditional Chi energy points of the body. The sticks are intended to keep the villain from accessing the power from those points, which is why he was first concerned about removing them before attempting to break his chains.
  • The scene where Po enters the Jade palace, where he is amazed by all the relics, is based on the director's first experience entering the Skywalker Ranch of George Lucas, where all the props from the [Star Wars] movies can be found.
  • According to an interview with James Hong, his father owned a noodle shop. Once the producers found out about this, they incorporated it into his character, Mr. Ping.
  • To get the ambiance of the film, production designer [?] Raymond Zibach and art director [?] Heng Tang spent years researching Chinese art and kung fu movies. This effort, combined with the rest of the crew's extensive research and knowledge of Chinese culture, so impressed the Chinese that there were meetings by official government cultural bodies to discuss why their own country has not produced animated films of such quality themselves.
  • WILHELM SCREAM: When Tai Lung is escaping prison and is hitting the Rhino guards with a mace. He flings a guard into the air and when he kicks the guard through the door, just before he lands, you hear it.
  • According to his online diary, Jackie Chan recorded his voice-overs during a single 5 hour recording session in LA on October 15, 2007. He also recorded his lines for the Mandarin and Cantonese versions.
  • The individual fighting styles of the Furious Five members (Crane, Mantis, Tiger, Monkey and Viper) are actual martial art styles modeled after the particular animals. Po employs the bear-style of kung fu in his showdown with Tai Lung.
  • One character that needed revisions was Tai Lung, who continually seemed too sympathetic as the villain of the story. As a result, the producers included the sequence that illustrates the story Tigress told about Tai Lung's betrayal of his father's principles and his rampage after being refused the Dragon Scroll to make him sufficiently despicable to the audience. By contrast, Po was refined by Jack Black and the writers from an unpleasant obsessed fan who unsettled his heroes to an affable martial arts lore devotee painfully self-aware of his inadequacies.