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Cinderella [1950] (1 disc)

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Director:Clyde Geronimi
Hamilton Luske
Wilfred Jackson
Writer:Bill Peet
Erdman Penner
Harry Reeves
Homer Brightman
Joe Rinaldi
Ken Anderson
Ted Sears
Winston Hibler
Composer:Oliver Wallace
Paul J. Smith
Songs:Al Hoffman
Jerry Livingston
Mack David
Length:74 minutes
(1 hour 14 minutes)
MPAA Rating:UR
Sorting Category:Kids
IMDB Rating:7.3/10
Rotten Tomatoes Rating:97%
Amazon Rating:4.5/5 stars
User rating sites like above
are subject to change
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Classifications:
  • Fantasy
  • Kids
  • Cartoon
  • Comedy
  • Drama
  • Romance
  • Family
Available Formats:
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Synopsis: When Cinderella's cruel stepmother prevents her from attending the Royal Ball, she gets some unexpected help from the lovable mice Gus and Jaq, and from her Fairy Godmother.


Reaction: Classic Disney. One of those movies that everyone should see at least once in their lives.


Personal Rating: 7/10

Select Cast and Crew
Clyde Geronimi => Director
Hamilton Luske => Director
Wilfred Jackson => Director
Bill Peet => Writer
Erdman Penner => Writer
Harry Reeves => Writer
Homer Brightman => Writer
Joe Rinaldi => Writer
Ken Anderson => Writer
Ted Sears => Writer
Winston Hibler => Writer
Oliver Wallace => Composer
Paul J. Smith => Composer
Al Hoffman => Songs
Jerry Livingston => Songs
Mack David => Songs
Charles Perrault => Original Classic
Betty Lou Gerson => Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Claire Du Brey => (as Claire DuBrey) (voice)
Don Barclay => Doorman (voice)
Earl Keen => Bruno (voice) (uncredited)
Eleanor Audley => Lady Tremaine (voice)
Ilene Woods => Cinderella (voice)
James MacDonald => Jaq / Gus / Bruno (as James Macdonald) (voice)
June Foray => Lucifer (voice) (uncredited)
Lucille Bliss => Anastasia (voice) (uncredited)
Lucille Williams => Perla - a Mouse (voice) (uncredited)
Luis Van Rooten => King / Grand Duke (voice)
Marion Darlington => Birds (voice) (uncredited)
Marni Nixon => Main Title Soloist (voice) (uncredited)
Mike Douglas => Prince Charming (singing voice) (uncredited)
Rhoda Williams => Drizella (voice)
Thurl Ravenscroft => Additional Voices (voice) (uncredited)
Verna Felton => Fairy Godmother (voice)
William Phipps => Prince Charming (voice) (uncredited)

Random Trivia For This Title:

  • In the movie, Cinderella's dress is white, but in promotional material, it's blue.
  • When auditioning for the role of Prince Charming, Mike Douglas was asked where he was from. When he replied, in his Illinois accent, that he was from Chicago he was told that he wasn't going to do the speaking role and so William Phipps was cast as Prince Charming while Douglas sang for the role.
  • When Walt Disney had the resources to return to full-length animation in the late 1940s after the war, he was indecisive over whether they should release Cinderella or Alice in Wonderland first and finally decided to have two animation crews working on each film compete with each other to see not only which would finish first but also which did the best job. As it turned out, "Cinderella" came first, being released in 1950, while "Alice" was not released until the following year.
  • According to [?] Marc Davis, one of the directing animators of Cinderella, at least 90% of the movie was done in live action model before animation. Dancer [?] Ward Ellis was the live action model for Prince Charming. Cinderella's carriage is actually a live-action model painted white with black lines; this was the first time this technique had actually been used.
  • The Prince is never called "Prince Charming" in the film, nor is he given any personal name.
  • The carriage that Cinderella and the Prince take after the wedding has an emblem of a sword and two hidden Mickey Mouse heads around it.
  • To save money when animating the pumpkin coach, the animators drew the coach to seemingly float on air so that they would not have to animate the turning wheels or the filigrees.
  • Ilene Woods beat exactly 309 girls for the part of Cinderella, after some demo recordings of her singing a few of the film's songs were presented to Walt Disney. However, she had no idea she was auditioning for the part until Disney contacted her; she initially made the recordings for a few friends who sent them to Disney without telling her.
  • The transformation of Cinderella's torn dress to that of the white ball gown was considered to be Walt Disney's favorite piece of animation.
  • Cinderella actually loses a shoe three times in the film: first, when she delivers the breakfast trays (causing Lucifer to look under the wrong cup); second, when she is running from the ball; and third, walking down the steps with the prince.
  • Ilene Woods suffered from Alzheimer's disease in the later years of her life. During this time, she did not even remember that she had played Cinderella, but nurses claimed that she was very much comforted by the song "A Dream Is A Wish Your Heart Makes".