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Kate Winslet, Leonardo DiCaprio, James Cameron

James Cameron [12]


Born:August 16, 1954 (67)
Filmography Rating:8.22 / 10
IMDB Rating:7.74 / 10
Amazon Rating:4.41 / 5
Rotten Tomatoes Rating:86.82%
(Averages are weighted)
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List of Titles and Roles/Jobs:
The Terminator [1984](30) => Director / Writer
Aliens: Special Edition [1986](32) => Director / Writer
Aliens [1986](32) => Director / Writer
The Abyss: Extended Cut [1989](35) => Director / Writer
The Abyss [1989](35) => Director / Writer
Terminator 2: Judgment Day [1991](37) => Director / Writer
True Lies [1994](40) => Director / Writer
Titanic [1997](43) => Director / Writer / Steerage Dancer (uncredited)
The Abyss: Special Edition [2005](51) => Director / Writer
Avatar [2009](55) => Director / Writer
Alita: Battle Angel [2019](65) => Writer
Terminator: Dark Fate [2019](65) => Producer

Trivia that mentions this person:
The Abyss [1989]
  • The fictional company "Benthic Petroleum" also owns the gas station shown in James Cameron's Terminator 2: Judgment Day and the flying oil tanker in Jan de Bont's Twister.
  • Fluid breathing is a reality. Five rats were used for five different takes, all of whom survived and were given shots by a vet. The rat that actually appeared in the film died of natural causes a few weeks before the film opened. According to James Cameron, the scene with the rat had to be edited out of the UK movie version because "the Royal Veterinarian felt that it was painful for the rat". James Cameron repeatedly assures that the rats used for this take didn't suffer any harm.
    The Abyss: Extended Cut [1989]
  • Director James Cameron contacted Orson Scott Card before filming began with the possibility of producing a book based on the film. Card initially told his agent that he doesn't do "novelizations", but when she told him that the director was James Cameron, he agreed to consider it. The script arrived, and Card signed on after receiving assurances from Cameron that he would be free to develop his "novel" the way he wanted to. After a meeting with Cameron, Card immediately wrote the first three chapters, which dealt with events concerning Bud and Lindsay Brigman that occurred before the events in the film. Cameron gave these chapters to Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, who used it to develop their characters.
  • Fluid breathing is a reality. Five rats were used for five different takes, all of whom survived and were given shots by a vet. The rat that actually appeared in the film died of natural causes a few weeks before the film opened. According to James Cameron, the scene with the rat had to be edited out of the UK movie version because "the Royal Veterinarian felt that it was painful for the rat". James Cameron repeatedly assures that the rats used for this take didn't suffer any harm.
  • Michael Biehn's character gets bitten on the arm by another character. This happens to him in every James Cameron movie he's in - see The Terminator and Aliens.
  • The fictional company "Benthic Petroleum" also owns the gas station shown in James Cameron's Terminator 2: Judgment Day and the flying oil tanker in Jan de Bont's Twister.
    The Abyss: Special Edition [2005]
  • The crew frequently spent enough time underwater to force them to undergo decompression before surfacing. James Cameron would often watch dailies through a glass window, while decompressing and hanging upside down to relieve the stress on his shoulders from the weight of the helmet.
  • Director James Cameron contacted Orson Scott Card before filming began with the possibility of producing a book based on the film. Card initially told his agent that he doesn't do "novelizations", but when she told him that the director was James Cameron, he agreed to consider it. The script arrived, and Card signed on after receiving assurances from Cameron that he would be free to develop his "novel" the way he wanted to. After a meeting with Cameron, Card immediately wrote the first three chapters, which dealt with events concerning Bud and Lindsay Brigman that occurred before the events in the film. Cameron gave these chapters to Ed Harris and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio, who used it to develop their characters.
  • The fictional company "Benthic Petroleum" also owns the gas station shown in James Cameron's Terminator 2: Judgment Day and the flying oil tanker in Jan de Bont's Twister.
    Aliens [1986]
  • When filming the scene with Newt in the duct, Carrie Henn kept deliberately blowing her scene so she could slide down the vent, which she later called a slide three stories tall. James Cameron finally dissuaded her by saying that if she completed the shot, she could play on it as much as she wanted. She did, and he kept his promise.
  • Sigourney Weaver told James Cameron that she wanted to do three things in the movie; not handle a weapon, die, and make love to an alien. While none of these wishes were fulfilled, she got to do all three in the later movies.
  • Like most films, the movie wasn't shot in sequence. But for added realism, James Cameron filmed the scene where we first meet the Colonial Marines (one of the earliest scenes) last. This was so that the camaraderie of the marines was realistic because the actors had spent months filming together.
    Aliens: Special Edition [1986]
  • When filming the scene with Newt in the duct, Carrie Henn kept deliberately blowing her scene so she could slide down the vent, which she later called a slide three stories tall. James Cameron finally dissuaded her by saying that if she completed the shot, she could play on it as much as she wanted. She did, and he kept his promise.
  • Sigourney Weaver told James Cameron that she wanted to do three things in the movie; not handle a weapon, die, and make love to an alien. While none of these wishes were fulfilled, she got to do all three in the later movies.
  • Like most films, the movie wasn't shot in sequence. But for added realism, James Cameron filmed the scene where we first meet the Colonial Marines (one of the earliest scenes) last. This was so that the camaraderie of the marines was realistic because the actors had spent months filming together.
    Aliens: Collector's Edition [1986]
  • Sigourney Weaver told James Cameron that she wanted to do three things in the movie; not handle a weapon, die, and make love to an alien. While none of these wishes were fulfilled, she got to do all three in the later movies.
  • Like most films, the movie wasn't shot in sequence. But for added realism, James Cameron filmed the scene where we first meet the Colonial Marines (one of the earliest scenes) last. This was so that the camaraderie of the marines was realistic because the actors had spent months filming together.
  • When filming the scene with Newt in the duct, Carrie Henn kept deliberately blowing her scene so she could slide down the vent, which she later called a slide three stories tall. James Cameron finally dissuaded her by saying that if she completed the shot, she could play on it as much as she wanted. She did, and he kept his promise.
    Predator [1987]
  • The mandibles of the predator were the idea of James Cameron.
    AVP: Alien vs. Predator: Unrated Version [2004]
  • James Cameron claimed that he thought the film was pretty good and that he liked it a lot.
    AVP: Alien vs. Predator [2004]
  • While this film languished in so-called "development hell" for years, 20th-Century Fox considered producing a fifth film in the [Alien] franchise instead. James Cameron, who wrote and directed Aliens, had written a script and even approached Sigourney Weaver to star and Ridley Scott to direct, both of whom expressed interest. When the studio decided to use the Alien/Preadator crossover story instead, Cameron, Weaver and Scott all distanced themselves from the project, and later, declared they would never work on either franchise again.
  • James Cameron claimed that he thought the film was pretty good and that he liked it a lot.
    Godzilla [1998]
  • When this modern remake was first conceived in 1990 James Cameron was originally offered the chance to direct. When he passed Tim Burton was connected for a few years, with Joe Johnston's name bandied about for some time also. Paul Verhoeven was going to direct but he passed on the project. Then Jan de Bont was attached and set to direct but his budget for the film, estimated at $150 million, was higher than the studio was willing to pay. After he was let go, Roland Emmerich and Dean Devlin came in.
    Spider-Man [2002]
  • Several names that were considered for various parts (some more seriously than others) over the years in which this project was in development include:
    Nicolas Cage, John Malkovich, and Edward Norton as the Goblin; James Franco, Leonardo DiCaprio, Freddie Prinze Jr., Scott Speedman, [?] Jay Rodan, [?] Scott Leva, and Charlie Sheen as Peter Parker/Spiderman; [?] Marion Ross as Aunt May; [?] Tony Scott, Jan de Bont, James Cameron, Roland Emmerich, Ang Lee, David Fincher, and Chris Columbus as Director.
    The Terminator [1984]
  • The original treatment by James Cameron included the detail that the Terminator needed to eat periodically in order for his human flesh to survive. A scene is included where the Terminator eats a candy bar, wrapper and all. This detail was incorporated into the script for Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, with the Terminator selecting Arnold Schwarzenegger's favorite Austrian chocolate wafer. When fans learned that a scene had shot where the Terminator ate chocolate, the reaction was overwhelmingly negative and the scene was omitted.
  • Michael Biehn's character gets bitten on the hand by another character. This happens to him in every James Cameron movie he's in (i.e. Aliens and The Abyss).
  • The beginning of production was postponed for nine months, due to Arnold Schwarzenegger's commitment to Conan the Destroyer. During this time, James Cameron wanted to be working but didn't have the time to do a whole other film so he took on a writing assignment; this turned out to be Aliens.
  • Near the beginning of the movie, when Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton) receives a message on her answering machine breaking her date, the voice on the machine is James Cameron's. Years later, Hamilton and Cameron got married and subsequently divorced.
  • (Also a spoiler for Terminator 2: Judgment Day) Two deleted scenes gave Skynet and the Future War some more background. The first was a scene where Sarah discovers that a company called Cyberdyne will be responsible for building Skynet and the Terminators. She tries to convince Reese that they should destroy this company, in order to prevent the dark future from ever happening. Reese tells her that his mission is conserving the future, not changing it. The second scene shows that Cyberdyne owns the factory where Sarah battled the Terminator, and one of their employees finding the Terminator's microchip (this event actually causes Skynet to exist in the first place). Both these ideas became major plot points for the sequel Terminator 2: Judgment Day. Director James Cameron cut the scenes because he wanted to leave some questions yet unanswered, which he never regretted as he could make an entire sequel out of the unused ideas.
  • Science fiction author Harlan Ellison sued James Cameron, claiming that the film was plagiarized from the two [The Outer Limits] episodes that Ellison wrote, namely {The Outer Limits: Soldier} (#2.1) and {The Outer Limits: Demon with a Glass Hand} (#2.5). The concept of "Skynet" could also have been borrowed from an Ellison short story called {I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream}. The suit was settled out of court and newer prints of the film acknowledge Ellison.
    Terminator 2: Judgment Day [1991]
  • Most of Edward Furlong's voice had to be re-dubbed by Furlong again in post-production because it changed during shooting. His young voice is left intact only in the scene where he and Terminator are talking about why people cry, because James Cameron wanted it to sound dramatic and thought it was better if left intact.
  • The original script did not call for the top of the truck to be ripped off during the chase through the storm drain beside/beneath the freeway, but when they arrived on location they found that the cab wouldn't fit under the overpass so director James Cameron decided that the roof was going to have to come off.
    True Lies [1994]
  • When Arnold Schwarzenegger rescues wife Jamie Lee Curtis from an airborne chopper, he grasps her by her arm just as the chopper heads out over the water. The woman you see dangling below the chopper skid is no body double, but Curtis doing her very own stunt work. At her insistence, director James Cameron agreed to let her perform this scary spectacle. According to Jamie Lee Curtis, on the TV special promoting True Lies, it was Cameron's idea for her to do the helicopter work; she said, "Oh, yeah. And just where are you going to be while I'm dangling way up there in the air, Jim?" And, according to her, he said, "Hanging out the door filming you with a hand-held camera." So she decided that if he was willing to do that to get the shot, she could stand to do it, too. The stunt was filmed on her birthday.
  • A sequel to True Lies was once in the works, which would've reunited the principal cast as well as been directed by James Cameron, who directed the first movie. A script was even ready for this sequel, and had the movie been made, it would've been released sometime in 2002. The sequel idea was eventually scrapped (or at least indefinitely shelved) due to script problems as well the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Cameron even said in an interview that he dropped his sequel plans because "in this day and age, terrorism just isn't funny anymore".
  • In an interview, James Cameron says that the script was brought to him by Arnold Schwarzenegger who said that he wanted to do it because he thought the Tasker character was interesting. Cameron was shocked because he had never seen Scwarzenegger pick a script based solely on his interest in a character and decided that he saw the same thing and made the movie.
    AVP: Alien Versus Predator [2004]
  • James Cameron claimed that he thought the film was pretty good and that he liked it a lot.
    Prometheus [2012]
  • In 2002, Aliens director James Cameron discussed ideas for a fifth Alien film with Ridley Scott, with the intention that Cameron would produce the film with Scott directing, and Sigourney Weaver returning to star in the lead role of Ripley. However upon discovering that 20th Century Fox were developing the crossover film AVP: Alien vs. Predator, Cameron ceased all work on the project, believing that the crossover would "kill the validity of the franchise". Though Cameron went on to state that he would never again work with the [Alien] franchise, Scott eventually ended up reworking their idea into this film.
    X-Men: Days of Future Past [2014]
  • According to Bryan Singer, he had a two-hour discussion with James Cameron, director of the time-travel films The Terminator and Terminator 2: Judgment Day, about how to make the time-travel concept feasible and workable within the film. The concepts the two discussed included quantum physics, alternate universes, and string theory. Bryan Singer based the time travel in the film on string theory: "Until an object is observed, it hasn't really happened yet. The time-traveller whose consciousness travels through time I call The Observer, and until the Observer returns to where he travelled from, the result hasn't occurred yet. So he can muck about in the past and it isn't until he snaps back that the new future is set. As a result, we have parallel action, and there's underlying tension because there's always that threat Wolverine's consciousness could return to the future and leave the world in an even darker place."
    Terminator Genisys [2015]
  • James Cameron gave advice to producers David Ellison and David Goldberg on how they could use a 67 year old Arnold Schwarzenegger in the film, by stating that the living human tissue that is grown on The Terminators, giving them their human forms is not actually synthetic, but organic and could therefore age and that they could have a Terminator sent back through time, missed his target and ended up living in society and due to his brain, which is a neural processor (a learning computer) he could actually become more human and went along without getting discovered.
  • This is Arnold Schwarzenegger's first movie for Paramount Pictures and Paramount studio's first film in The [Terminator] series. James Cameron had first approached them to do The Terminator and they were very interested. However, the only stipulation was that James Cameron did not direct the film. Since this was Cameron's pet project at the time and he wanted to direct the film, he turned down their offer.
  • Paramount greenlit two sequels to this film before it even opened because regardless of how well or poor it does at the Box Office or with critic reviews, making this the first installment of a new trilogy of [Terminator] films. All film rights to the [Terminator] series are set to revert back to James Cameron in the year 2019.
  • James Cameron officially endorsed this film. He says he considers it the official third film in the franchise.
    Avatar [2009]
  • Director James Cameron, known for being tough on set, allegedly kept a nail-gun on set that he would use to nail cell phones, that had the misfortune of ringing, to a wall above the exit sign.
  • Matt Damon and Jake Gyllenhaal were the studio's first choices to play Jake Sully, but James Cameron decided to cast the unknown Sam Worthington in the lead role.
  • Michael Biehn was considered for the role of Col. Quaritch. James Cameron rejected him because he'd already cast Sigourney Weaver, and he didn't want people to think it was Aliens all over again.
  • James Cameron initially wanted [?] Q'orianka Kilcher to play Neytiri, based on her role as Pocahontas in The New World. He admitted in an interview that he got the idea for Avatar after watching Disney's 1995 animated film Pocahontas.
  • The Na'vi language was created entirely from scratch by linguist Dr. [?] Paul R. Frommer. James Cameron hired him to construct a language that the actors could pronounce easily, but did not resemble any single human language. Frommer created about 1,000 words. Sam Worthington said in an interview that it was easier for him to master the Na'vi language than the American accent.
  • This movie took four years to make, from pre-production to release. James Cameron originally planned to have the film completed for release in 1999. At the time, the special effects he wanted increased the budget to $400 million. No studio would fund the film, and it was shelved for eight years.
  • James Cameron was convinced that CGI effects had progressed enough to make this film when he saw Gollum in The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers.
  • According to James Cameron, the Na'vi are blue to create a conceptual parallel with traditional Hindu depictions of God (e.g., Vishnu and his later "avatars"--a Sanskrit word meaning "a manifestation of divinity in bodily form"--such as Rama, Krishna, etc.) but also because Cameron just liked the color blue.
  • James Cameron wanted an unknown actor to play Jake Sully, because it would give the character a "real" quality--the guy you want to have a beer with, who ultimately becomes the leader who transforms a whole world.
    Blade Runner: The Final Cut [1982]
  • Arnold Schwarzenegger was considered to play Rick Deckard which went to Harrison Ford. Two years later, Arnold starred in The Terminator by James Cameron who wrote and directed Aliens, the sequel to Alien which was directed by Ridley Scott. Arnold later worked with Ford on The Expendables 3.
    Titanic [1997]
  • [?] Lindsay Lohan auditioned for the role of Cora Cartmell. Lohan, who was then an unknown and was only 8 years old at the time casting took place, was the top choice for the role. However, James Cameron felt that Lohan's fiery red hair would confuse people into thinking she was related to the characters Rose and Ruth, who both had fiery red hair. [?] Alexandrea Owens was cast instead.
  • James Cameron instructed the actors playing the officers to keep order amongst the extras in the sinking scenes. [?] Jonny Phillips ad-libbed the moment when he whips around with the gun and shouts "keep back, or I'll shoot you all like dogs!" After the take, James Cameron ran up to him and told him it was great and to do it again, and Phillips asked "What did I say?", having been too caught up in the moment to realize what he was doing.
  • Christian Bale auditioned for the role of Jack Dawson, but was turned down because James Cameron didn't want two British actors playing the lead roles of two Americans.
  • The studios wanted Matthew McConaughey to play Jack, but James Cameron insisted on Leonardo DiCaprio. McConaughey and DiCaprio went on to co-star in The Wolf of Wall Street (2013).
  • James Cameron was adamant about not including any song in the film, even over the closing credits. Composer James Horner secretly arranged with lyricist [?] Will Jennings and singer CÚline Dion to write "My Heart Will Go On" and record a demo tape which he then presented to Cameron, who responded very favorably and included the song over the closing credits. The song went on to win the Academy Award for Best Original Song.
  • Reportedly, James Cameron spoke to and personally provided each of the extras (at least 150 of them) with names and back stories of Titanic passengers.
  • When Jack is preparing to draw Rose, he says to her, "Over on the bed...the couch." The line was scripted "Lie on that couch", but Leonardo DiCaprio made an honest mistake and James Cameron liked it so much he kept it in.
  • The hands seen sketching Rose are not Leonardo DiCaprio's, but director James Cameron's. In post-production, Cameron, who is left-handed, mirror-imaged the sketching shots so the artist would appear to be right-handed, like DiCaprio.
  • James Cameron's regular Michael Biehn was nearly cast as Cal Hockley and attended numerous meetings with Cameron to discuss the role. Pierce Brosnan, Rupert Everett, Peter Greene, William Hurt, Jason Isaacs, Rob Lowe, Matthew McConaughey, [?] Adrian Pauland Rufus Sewell were also considered, though ultimately the part went to Billy Zane.
  • River Phoenix was James Cameron's first choice to play Jack Dawson. By the time the movie was made, River Phoenix had died and Leonardo DiCaprio had reached the perfect age. Ironically when Johnny Depp was offered the role of Jack, he turned it down.
    John Carter [2012]
  • The film's final budget was some $20 million more than James Cameron spent on Avatar(2009).
    Hugo [2011]
  • After a screening that James Cameron attended, he called this movie a "masterpiece", and told Director Martin Scorsese it was the best use of 3-D he had seen, including his own movies.
    Terminator: Dark Fate [2019]
  • One of the things that director Tim Miller and writer/producer James Cameron disagreed on was the reason for the time travel in the movie. Miller initially suggested to have humanity lose the battle against Legion, and in a complete reversal of previous movies, it would be the humans who went back in time first, in order to "strangle it in the crib" and change their future. Although Miller thought that the idea of humanity losing and resorting to time travel as a last stand would be dramatically interesting, it wasn't Cameron's thing.
  • James Cameron considers the film to be a direct sequel to his own films The Terminator (1984) and Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991). He was not involved in Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines (2003), Terminator Salvation (2009) and Terminator Genisys (2015), so Terminator: Dark Fate disregards the events of these films, as well as the short-lived TV series [Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles (2008)]. In 2017, Cameron commented that he has been generally supportive of those films due to his close friendship with Arnold Schwarzenegger, but for various reasons, they did not work for him, so he decided to produce a true sequel himself. This means that Rise of the Machines, Salvation, Genisys and Sarah Connor Chronicles are being described as occurring in alternate timelines.
  • Producer and series creator James Cameron has stated that he was involved in the movie's writing, but didn't interfere with Tim Miller's direction, as he never visited the set. However, after the first rough cut of the movie, Cameron stepped in for some uncredited editing (as he is an accomplished editor), finding Miller's version to be "pretty rough [and] pretty long". He admitted that he and Miller had their share of disagreements, which at times "became a bloodbath. And the blood is still being scrubbed off the walls from those creative battles. This is a film that was forged in fire. But that's the creative process, right?" Miller, in turn, acknowledged the behind-the-scenes disagreements, but stated that many of these came down to "stuff that I had cut that [Cameron] thought was important", and "small lines that I saw as "poetic and beautiful" but which he didn't care for". Miller also said that although he maintained a good relationship with Cameron, he preferred to have more control on his next projects, and would be unlikely to work with him again.
    Alita: Battle Angel [2019]
  • The manga series is titled "Gunnm" and was released in America as "Battle Angel Alita." In 2010, producer [?] Jon Landau commented, "I'm telling people that we have to call it 'Alita: Battle Angel,' because Jim only does T&A movies." Most of James Cameron's movie titles begin with the letter "A" or "T," Aliens (1986), The Terminator (1984), The Abyss (1989), Avatar (2009), True Lies (1994), and Titanic (1997).
  • This marks the first professional collaboration between James Cameron and Robert Rodriguez. Due to his prior commitments to direct the four sequels to Avatar (2009), Cameron could only serve as the producer and co-screenwriter on this film, with Rodriguez taking the directorial duties. In an interview with Empire magazine on December 8, 2017, Rodriguez said of the collaboration with Cameron, "This just doesn't happen. Guys like [?] Quentin Tarantino and Jim only write scripts for themselves to direct. When Avatar becomes the biggest movie of all time, he told me that he's going to spend the rest of his career making Avatars, so I said, 'What happens to Battle Angel then?', because as a fan I was just interested! And he said, 'I don't think I'll ever get to do that. Hey, if you can figure out the script, you can shoot it!' So I took it home, spent all summer working on it, cut it down to 130, 125 pages, without cutting anything that he missed. It was a great gift. We had a blast; anytime I had a question I could just call him or email him and he would send back these hugely detailed answers that were so helpful. He just loves being the producer that he always wants. The guy's just so freakin' smart. Getting to learn from someone like that was the greatest internship ever."
    Jason X [2001]
  • During Jason X's development process, director James Isaac, producer [?] Noel Cunningham (Sean's son), and screenwriter Todd Farmer kicked around any scenario they could think of it, typically "Jason in [insert blank] (the hood, snow, underwater, the arctic, in L.A. fighting gangs, on safari)." They even considered something involving the NASCAR circuit. Farmer suggested "in space" because he knew Freddy vs. Jason (2003) was on the way, and it'd be best if Jason X was set after the events of that epic battle. So, they needed to jump into the future, and going into space certainly did that. They were a little scared of doing a horror sequel in space [see: Hellraiser, Leprechaun, and Critters.], but they thought it could be fun to do a mash-up of Ridley Scott's Alien (1979) and James Cameron's Aliens (1986) with not one but two strong Ripley-type females on a ship of bad-ass space marines hunted by Jason instead of xenomorphs.