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Ridley Scott

Ridley Scott [8]


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Born:November 30, 1937 (79)
Filmography Rating:8.46 / 10
IMDB Rating:7.29 / 10
Amazon Rating:4.28 / 5
Rotten Tomatoes Rating:81.49%
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List of Titles and Roles/Jobs:
Alien [1979](42) => Director
Alien: Collector's Edition [1979](42) => Director
Alien: Director's Cut [1979](42) => Director
Legend: U.S. Release [1985](48) => Director
Legend: Ultimate Edition [1985](48) => Director
Legend: Director's Cut [2001](64) => Director
Prometheus [2012](75) => Director
Alien: Covenant [2017](80) => Director

Trivia that mentions this person:
Alien [1979]
  • 20th Century Fox doubled the budget from $4.2 million to $8.4 million on the strength of seeing Ridley Scott's storyboards.
    Alien: Director's Cut [1979]
  • Ridley Scott is reportedly quoted as saying that originally he wanted a much darker ending. He planned on having the alien bite off Ripley's head in the escape shuttle, sit in her chair, and then start speaking with her voice in a message to Earth. Apparently, 20th Century Fox wasn't too pleased with such a dark ending.
  • [?] Jon Finch was originally cast as Kane but on the first day of shooting, he looked extremely ill. Medics were called and [?] Jon Finch was immediately taken to hospital where it was discovered that he had an extreme case of diabetes. Ridley Scott knew that John Hurt was in town, so he approached him that night about playing Kane. John Hurt was on set the following day.
    Alien: Collector's Edition [1979]
  • A scene originally cut, but re-inserted for the Director's Cut shows Lambert slapping Ripley in retaliation for Ripley's refusal to let her, Dallas, and Kane back on the ship. According to both Ridley Scott and Veronica Cartwright, every time she went to slap Sigourney Weaver, Sigourney would shy away. After about three or four takes of this, Scott finally told Cartwright "Not to hold back. Really hit her." Thus the very real shocked reactions of Weaver, Yaphet Kotto, and Harry Dean Stanton.
  • A closer look at the alien eggs in the scene right before the facehugger reveals that slime on the eggs is dripping from bottom to top. Ridley Scott did this intentionally by shooting with the camera upside down.
  • The space jockey prop was 26 feet tall and the three crew members--Lambert, Dallas, and Kane--who find the mumified creature are portrayed by Ridley Scott's two children and another child; this was done to make the model appear larger.
    Aliens [1986]
  • The name for the company, "Weyland Yutani", was taken from the names of Ridley Scott's former neighbors. He hated them, so he decided to "dedicate" the name of the "evil company" to them.
    Aliens: Special Edition [1986]
  • The name for the company, "Weyland Yutani", was taken from the names of Ridley Scott's former neighbors. He hated them, so he decided to "dedicate" the name of the "evil company" to them.
    Aliens: Collector's Edition [1986]
  • The name for the company, "Weyland Yutani", was taken from the names of Ridley Scott's former neighbors. He hated them, so he decided to "dedicate" the name of the "evil company" to them.
    AVP: Alien vs. Predator [2004]
  • While this film languished in so-called "development hell" for years, 20th-Century Fox considered producing a fifth film in the [Alien] franchise instead. James Cameron, who wrote and directed Aliens, had written a script and even approached Sigourney Weaver to star and Ridley Scott to direct, both of whom expressed interest. When the studio decided to use the Alien/Preadator crossover story instead, Cameron, Weaver and Scott all distanced themselves from the project, and later, declared they would never work on either franchise again.
    Dune [1984]
  • Ridley Scott worked on bringing the film to the screen, but was unsuccessful. H.R. Giger (who worked with Scott on Alien) was hired as a production designer.
    Legend: Director's Cut [2001]
  • The face of goblin Blix was designed after that of Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones. According to Alice Playten, she thought up the idea, which was supported by director Ridley Scott. He then had [?] Rob Bottin (special make-up effects) implement the concept.
  • This version of the movie was dramatically cut after Ridley Scott heard the audience ragging on it in the original premier.
  • Ridley Scott drew most of his inspiration for Legend from the 1946 version of La belle et la bÍte, as well as such Disney animated classics as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Fantasia and Bambi.
  • Mia Sara was only 15 during the filming of Legend. Sara was actually born in 1967, so she was 15 in 1982, which is when production for the film began. But it took a further three years before Legend was finally completed by Ridley Scott because of the film's immensely troubled production history.
  • Ridley Scott was inspired to cast Tim Curry as Darkness after seeing The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He had also considered casting Richard O'Brien as Meg Mucklebones.
  • This version of the movie restores much of the scenes and story elements that were cut after Ridley Scott heard the audience ragging on it in the original premier.
    Legend: U.S. Release [1985]
  • The face of goblin Blix was designed after that of Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones. According to Alice Playten, she thought up the idea, which was supported by director Ridley Scott. He then had [?] Rob Bottin (special make-up effects) implement the concept.
  • Ridley Scott drew most of his inspiration for Legend from the 1946 version of La belle et la bÍte, as well as such Disney animated classics as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Fantasia and Bambi.
  • Mia Sara was only 15 during the filming of Legend. Sara was actually born in 1967, so she was 15 in 1982, which is when production for the film began. But it took a further three years before Legend was finally completed by Ridley Scott because of the film's immensely troubled production history.
  • Ridley Scott was inspired to cast Tim Curry as Darkness after seeing The Rocky Horror Picture Show. He had also considered casting Richard O'Brien as Meg Mucklebones.
  • This version of the movie was dramatically cut after Ridley Scott heard the audience ragging on it in the original premier.
    Legend: Ultimate Edition [1985]
  • The face of goblin Blix was designed after that of Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones. According to Alice Playten, she thought up the idea, which was supported by director Ridley Scott. He then had [?] Rob Bottin (special make-up effects) implement the concept.
  • This version of the movie was dramatically cut after Ridley Scott heard the audience ragging on it in the original premier.
  • Ridley Scott drew most of his inspiration for Legend from the 1946 version of La belle et la bÍte, as well as such Disney animated classics as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Fantasia and Bambi.
  • Mia Sara was only 15 during the filming of Legend. Sara was actually born in 1967, so she was 15 in 1982, which is when production for the film began. But it took a further three years before Legend was finally completed by Ridley Scott because of the film's immensely troubled production history.
  • The US theatrical version of the movie was dramatically edited down, paring out both scenes and whole story elements after Ridley Scott heard the audience ragging on it in the original premier.
    The Mummy Returns [2001]
  • The interiors of the O'Connells' house were filmed in the Shepperton Studios offices used by Ridley Scott and [?] Tony Scott.
    The Shining [1980]
  • Outtakes of the shots of the Volkswagen traveling towards the Overlook at the start of the film were plundered by Ridley Scott (with Stanley Kubrick's permission) when he was forced to add the 'happy ending' to the original release of Blade Runner.
    Prometheus [2012]
  • Ridley Scott initially wanted Max von Sydow for the role of Peter Weyland. However, Scott and Damon Lindelof conceived of a scene in which David the android (Michael Fassbender) would interface with Weyland while in hypersleep, and that Weyland's dream would reflect his looks as a younger man since he is obsessed with immortality. Though the scene was cut from the script and never filmed, Guy Pearce had already been cast in the role and thus underwent extensive make-up to appear elderly.
  • Ridley Scott stated that he was filming "the most aggressive film [he] could" by not caring about MPAA ratings, having support for such bold movement from 20th Century Fox CEO Tom Rothman, who addressed Alien fans by saying that he was "very aware of their concern", and that "they can take it that the film will not be compromised either way. So if that means that the film is R, then it'll be an R. If it's PG-13, then it'll be a PG-13, but it will not be compromised." Scott shot the film with both adult-only R and more accessible PG-13 film ratings in mind, allowing the more adult content to be cut if necessary without harming the overall presentation, given the case it was asked to be cut down. Eventually, the film was rated "R for Sci-Fi violence including some intense images, and brief language", and it was released without any demanded cuts.
  • Ridley Scott instructed Charlize Theron to stand in corners and move in lurking movements, in order to accentuate Vickers's distant, enigmatic nature.
  • In 2002, Aliens director James Cameron discussed ideas for a fifth Alien film with Ridley Scott, with the intention that Cameron would produce the film with Scott directing, and Sigourney Weaver returning to star in the lead role of Ripley. However upon discovering that 20th Century Fox were developing the crossover film AVP: Alien vs. Predator, Cameron ceased all work on the project, believing that the crossover would "kill the validity of the franchise". Though Cameron went on to state that he would never again work with the [Alien] franchise, Scott eventually ended up reworking their idea into this film.
  • During production, Ridley Scott kept the use of computer-generated imagery as low as possible, using CGI mainly in space scenes; Scott recalled advice VFXpert [?] Douglas Trumbull gave him on the set of Blade Runner: "If you can do it live, do it live", and also claimed that practical VFX was more cost-effective than digital VFX.
  • Ridley Scott decided against featuring Xenomorphs (the titular Alien of the film series) in the film, as "the sequels squeezed him dry, he did very well... and no way am I going back there." Instead, this being an indirect prequel to Alien, he decided to feature a Xenomorph ancestor/parent.
    Alien: Covenant [2017]
  • Some of the scenes were filmed in Sydney, Australia, at Fox Studios. Ridley Scott gave Michael Fassbender time off between takes, in order for him to attend the X-Men: Apocalypse premiere, held in the same area.
  • On November 27, 2015, Director Ridley Scott announced that this film would be the second (following Prometheus) in a new Alien trilogy, which will take place closer to, and lead up to, the original film. He has since suggested that there may even be a fourth prequel film.
  • This was the first [Alien] film to be released after the death of H.R. Giger. Giger inadvertently designed the original Alien looks and environments in his "Necronomicon" book, which led to Ridley Scott hiring him as Art Director for the film (and franchise). Giger essentially gave birth to the entire [Alien] look that we all know.
  • The original treatment for this movie, as revealed by director Ridley Scott in 2012, when the film was still in development, was to be a more faithful sequel to Prometheus. Titled "Paradise Lost," it would have drifted even further from the [Alien] mythology, and focused almost exclusively on the backstory of the engineers, the origins of humanity, and how the engineers created humans and xenomorphs. The prequels would then conclude with a film that ties itself in to the original [Alien] movies. Ridley Scott pursued this idea because he felt that the [Alien] franchise lost its touch and was overdone and overexposed, and as such, wanted to try a different approach. However, due to the divided fan reactions of Prometheus, Scott abandoned this direction and took a different approach instead, specifically to reintroduce the [Alien] mythos much sooner, with the classic Xenomorph.